Britain 1918-45

The maps that follow show the number of times the Conservative, Labour and Liberal parties won each constituency at each General Election between (and including) 1918 and 1945. I hope that any errors are minor and that the maps are found to be useful (or at least interesting, or at least pretty) by other people.

Liberals (see notes)

Liberals (see notes)

Notes

  1. The history of the Liberal Party during the interwar years is one of splits and splinter groups the nature of which was often rather Byzantine. I have decided to include both competing Liberal Parties (the one led by David Lloyd George and the one led by H.H. Asquith) in the map, to include Lloyd George’s ‘Independent Liberals’ as well, but not to include the National Liberals formed after the 1931 crisis. An argument exists for including the latter in the Conservative map: this I have chosen not to do either.
  2. The history of the Labour Party during the interwar years is also one of splits and spliter groups, albeit one in which the mother Party emerged paradoxically stronger as a result. I have decided not to include the ILP candidates of 1931, 1935 and 1945 in the Labour map (however tempting the idea of doing so certainly is) and have obviously not included the National Labour candidats of 1931 or 1935 either. I have also not included the small number of Communist candidates who were endorsed by the NEC in the 1920s in the Labour map. And yet the sole ‘National Socialist’ elected independently in 1918 I have included (West Ham Silvertown) and quite possibly out of whimsy.
  3. Things are much less complex for the Tories, even if they were often elected from a bewildering range of local labels during the period. One minor issue to note: I have decided to include those ‘Constitutionalist’ candidates who later joined the Conservative Party as Tories and not to include those that did not.
  4. There were also a handful of candidates who could have been included in the above maps or ignored as independents. In most cases I have opted for the latter, but when a candidate was apparently locally well known to be of the X Party even if not strictly a member I have leaned the other way. This tricky matter is relevant for only a very small number of constituencies.
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